Author Topic: Original sources of Refuel Music  (Read 344 times)

KPM Lover

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Original sources of Refuel Music
« on: August 15, 2020, 10:19:17 PM »
Does anyone know where these musics on Refuel Music records comes from orignally? They are from 60's and 70's libraries.

I wait for the answer.

Thanks!


Lord Thames

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Re: Original sources of Refuel Music
« Reply #1 on: August 15, 2020, 11:27:35 PM »
They were originally made by Rediffusion - I think they were all originally recorded for their Reditune background music service (a competitor to Muzak), with some of them also appearing on the 'A Rediffusion International Music Production' series of library LPs, and on the commercial Rediffusion label. 

Refuel has also retitled most of the tracks, which makes finding the originals harder.

KPM Lover

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Re: Original sources of Refuel Music
« Reply #2 on: August 15, 2020, 11:52:54 PM »
Thanks a lot for the information. I didn't know this label.

Greetings!

apmnut

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Re: Original sources of Refuel Music
« Reply #3 on: August 15, 2020, 11:52:57 PM »
There was a thread on an older incarnation of the board that listed some of the original names for these tracks, but I don't know if it's been archived or not. The two I remember off the top of my head would be that "Saturday Night Live" by Pete Moore is originally known as "The Fat Man" and Ike Issacs' "Free as a Bird" was originally titled "Lutes and Flutes".

Lord Thames

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Re: Original sources of Refuel Music
« Reply #4 on: August 16, 2020, 02:48:19 PM »
Oh yes, I think I made a few contributions to that list!  Since then, I've managed to track down another one - 'The Fashion Of Love' by Sam Sklair and Ray Denny from 'Hi-Fidelity High Street' is actually 'I Fell In Love With Him', performed by the Ray Martin Orchestra, which was commercially released on the Rediffusion Gold Star label.  I ought to go through them all again!

Andrew

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Re: Original sources of Refuel Music
« Reply #5 on: August 19, 2020, 12:27:17 AM »
I would love to know which songs they were actually are.  It makes it so much easier when you're looking for something but don't know you have those tracks already.
Great as well when you can piece together a complete original album.

The Extreme Easy Listening releases rename everything as well.  Also I think some of the Carlin Archive Series ones?  Can't remember off the top of my head which others do if any.

apmnut

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Re: Original sources of Refuel Music
« Reply #6 on: August 19, 2020, 01:35:33 AM »
I would love to know which songs they were actually are.  It makes it so much easier when you're looking for something but don't know you have those tracks already.
Great as well when you can piece together a complete original album.

The Extreme Easy Listening releases rename everything as well.  Also I think some of the Carlin Archive Series ones?  Can't remember off the top of my head which others do if any.
Same with Soho Production Music's "Soho Archive" releases. One of these days I'll make lists of all those Extreme tracks and their original titles. Thankfully the GEMA database lists those by their original title as well as the new names - some of which are just weird. ("Go Frolic Yourself"? "The Giggle Wars"? "Totes My Goats"?" Whaa--?)

I'd really like to know why the rights-holders sometimes feel the need to retitle these tracks. Just a stupid idea IMO.

Upgrade

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Re: Original sources of Refuel Music
« Reply #7 on: August 19, 2020, 02:24:28 AM »
I have a strong suspicion itís meant as a way to circumvent copyright limitations and obfuscate sources.

Instrumentals are a lot easier to rename than songs with vocals since the titles arenít mentioned in the words.

Sound recordings vs. the sheet musicís compositions are granted two separate and distinct copyrights, each getting different copyright symbols with the P in a circle and a C in a circle.

The compositionís copyright is more or less straightforward, but proving the date of composition may be difficult if there was no published sheet music. In any case, library music almost exclusively deals with the sound recording, not the soundless sheet music.

In the US, sound recordings have a peculiar set of copyright restrictions where recordings made before 1972 are supposed to remain under blanket copyright until 2067. Recordings made after 1972 follow different conventions.

However, copyrightable status comes with strings attached, namely the songs must be made publicly available to purchase.

Therein lies the rub. Record labels are already scrambling to release alternate takes and unreleased tracks of 1960s artists like the rather tongue-in-cheek Bob Dylanís 50th Anniversary Copyright Extension Collection for sale in Europe. European copyright law permits unreleased tracks to become public domain after 50 years. Even still, it was an a limited CD-R pressing for 100 copies, hardly a wide release, but enough to qualify for copyright.

Library music by its nature is largely off-limits to be bought by the public. If you cannot prove when the recording was made and you keep changing the titles with new copyright dates, you could in effect extend the copyright in perpetuity simply due to lack of documentation.

Or it just be a ploy to make the catalog seem fresh by giving them new names and disguising where they came from in case a client already purchased music through the defunct companyís catalog.

Andrew

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Re: Original sources of Refuel Music
« Reply #8 on: August 19, 2020, 03:38:33 AM »
Thanks very much for the information, it's really interesting!