Author Topic: Elevator Music Question  (Read 312 times)

Andrew

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Elevator Music Question
« on: August 14, 2020, 01:58:43 AM »
Hello

I was wondering where "production elevator music" releases fit into everything.

What I mean is releases that were light elevator of popular songs, but weren't released commercially. 
I guess specially meant to distribute to stores instead of the general public?
I don't really know, I just go by what I find on discogs or through searches generally.
I have some Bill Loose ones that are pretty neat.

Would those be considered library?

Before these Syd Dale releases disappeared online for 2020, I managed to grab 126 albums of elevator music releases in lossless.

For example, here is Volume 32:
anonfiles.com/pfj0C5M5o5






« Last Edit: August 14, 2020, 02:02:53 AM by Andrew »

Andrew

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Re: Elevator Music Question
« Reply #1 on: August 14, 2020, 02:39:09 AM »


"Aww geez, another 25 GB!  Hard drives don't grow on trees you know."

Andrew

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Re: Elevator Music Question
« Reply #2 on: August 14, 2020, 02:45:09 AM »


Hmm, if I move these files to this drive, and these to this other, I'll have another terrabyte available.



Andrew

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Re: Elevator Music Question
« Reply #3 on: August 14, 2020, 02:50:04 AM »
I forgot to say what my answer is.

My answer is, if elevator music of pop songs was created for the use of stores then I consider it library.

The elevator music releases sound different than commercial releases.  They sound more like they are emulating the pop song, but very carefully/slowly/differently.  They use the main notes/tune of the original. Almost like they are playing the original song, but not, just lightly, slowly, weirdly.

I'm not sure how else to describe that sort of music.

So I consider non-commercial sets of albums meant to be elevator music separated from commercial releases, and potentially added to a separate folder of elevator music.
« Last Edit: August 14, 2020, 02:51:54 AM by Andrew »

Andrew

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Re: Elevator Music Question
« Reply #4 on: August 14, 2020, 02:55:42 AM »
So then what about commercial releases of pop songs.. there are tons of those, where is the line drawn?

I have lots of records of commercial records like that.  Ted Heath - The Big Ones.  An awesome Phase 4 record, released commercially.

I would consider that not library, because it was released/made for the general public.  "In The Year 2525" is an amazing track from that.. and "Don't Cha Hear Me Falling To Ya". 

I'm trying to find a point where I can spend some time on commercial releases that have awesome sounding library style music..  Urbie Green - Green Power - Comin' Home Baby and Lumps.

This Syd Dale stuff I would consider non-commercial, so library related.

Does that make sense in categorizing?


« Last Edit: August 14, 2020, 03:00:24 AM by Andrew »

stackjackson

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Re: Elevator Music Question
« Reply #5 on: August 14, 2020, 03:11:53 AM »
Have you ever read Joseph Lanza's Elevator Music? If not, it's a good place to start. The book has been revised a few times I believe since its first release in 1995.

https://www.press.umich.edu/8718/elevator_music
| Stack |

Muff Diver

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Re: Elevator Music Question
« Reply #6 on: August 14, 2020, 10:09:50 PM »
So then what about commercial releases of pop songs.. there are tons of those, where is the line drawn?

I have lots of records of commercial records like that.  Ted Heath - The Big Ones.  An awesome Phase 4 record, released commercially.

I would consider that not library, because it was released/made for the general public.  "In The Year 2525" is an amazing track from that.. and "Don't Cha Hear Me Falling To Ya". 

I'm trying to find a point where I can spend some time on commercial releases that have awesome sounding library style music..  Urbie Green - Green Power - Comin' Home Baby and Lumps.

This Syd Dale stuff I would consider non-commercial, so library related.

Does that make sense in categorizing?






I read this entire thread!  ;D  If you ever consider uploading more of the Syd Dale recordings, I'd love to hear them.


But seriously, what you're saying and questioning makes perfect sense to me. Sometimes there's no clear cut answer. *  **

Like drawers on a bureau, I think that Production Music (PM) has several uses, sales and promotion being just one of them.

As you wrote above, sometimes PM is a kind of musical wallpaper, adding a musical ambience to your dining experience, shopping (or shoplifting, as I like to call it  ;D), sitting nervously in a dentist's office (fear, loathing and dread), or just stuck in an elevator with Ethel Merman as she belts out Rod Stewart's greatest Disco hits. In situations like that, I recommend cyanide. But that's just me.

In scenarios such as above, the PM takes on a kind of reassuring emotional squeeze ball to keep the listener from doing themselves serious bodily injury. Or to distract from the tedium of squeezing fresh tomatoes, etc.

Other times, PM takes on a kind of soft, watered down pop sound. Not too much like the original to warrant charges of copyright infringement, but just enough to make the attentive listener take notice. This also works for film use, because who wants to spend all their music budget on a celebrity artists and composers?

Other times, like with various KPM, De Wolfe and Italian tracks that we've all heard and have our favorites, the music sounds as good (or better) than anything being played on commercial Top 40-type radio programming. In my own case, almost as soon as I discovered Production Music for myself, I also was introduced to similar-sounding genres such as Lounge, Easy Listening, and jazz applications such as Crime Lounge and Spy vibe type music. From that, I was further introduced to film Soundtracks, starting with James Bond, and growing from that point.

I fell hard for all these genres though Library Music has been and always will be my True Religion!

In no time at all, after I began to accumulate more music than I'd ever seen, I realized I had to organize all that music and quickly. I was facing an avalanche of music!

Organizing all those similar-sounding genres was a chore for me personally because I'd only just recently become introduced to the music and new absolutely dick about it. Organizing also indirectly furthering my personal musical experience and education. That's because, again, there's no set rules or proverbial lines in the sand about how the music is used, target audiences, changing musical styles, etc.

Case in point: we're here @ LMT, the most fabulous Library board on the planet, talking about our favorite genre of music. Which is kind of weird, because when PM was being composed and used for its intended purposes during the 60s, 70s, etc. this music was certainly NOT created, performed or marketed for a mass audience who would absolutely go bonkers over this music. That was then. This is now.

For decades, Production Music was an open, yet hidden, secret. Like when you visit an amusement park, you see employees, some of them walking around in costume, etc. You know they're there. You know they're only actors, not Mickey Mouse or Luke Streetwalker come to life just to hang out with you (cuz you're sooooo special!) at the park.

On the other hand, these same characters also blend in with the other themes and attractions in the park experience to the point that most folks don't even give them a second thought. These characters become like wallpaper, only there to enhance the experience of the customer. Few people ever think about peeking behind the curtain and checking out the working guts of the park, the animatronics, the employees hidden behind the walls and glass, who make everything run smoothly.

Production Music is like that, but on a societal level. It's there. We can hear it in radio jingles. Or during a football game, with the endless commercial interruptions, getting the customer jazzed up about a new car, or a pizza, etc. We see/hear it, but we pay it no mind. It's almost subliminal. And I think that for millions of other viewers/customers, it's definitely a subliminal effect.

For most of us here @ LMT and in other venues, who became cognizant of Production Music, the uses as well as the sheer beauty of this genre, I'd wager that we tend to be a little (or a lot!) more aware of the music on tv, radio, films, etc, exactly because we have become aware and we're constantly peeking behind the proverbial curtains.

That's how so many of us are interested in the music of a given film, or who've acquired same, or who enjoy it regularly. In this case, the music of the Monty Python franchise, Night of the Living Dead, Dawn of the Dead, NFL Films, etc, just to name a few.

This PM we love so much, was intended to be "invisible" by the masses. Heard, but not seen, as it were. Disposable music, and never to be thought of again.

Pop music, OTOH, is intended to be seen (music videos, Grammy's, Nammys, American Music Awards, Billboard Music Awards, et al) as well as heard. And that's why it sucks as a genre, for several decades now, imho).

Production Music has always been an afterthought. PM as a Musical Stepchild, if you will. In the last couple of decades, PM has become very popular and wacky people like you and me listen to it because we actually like it. That was NOT the intention of the creators and various heads of PM labels at the inception of the respective tracks & LPs. Life is funny like that  ;)













*  I get so excited when I think of The Gospel of Production Music. I can't help myself. I apologize for going long.

** I tend to write in a stream-of-consciousness style. Sometimes when I'm writing about a subject I love or have studied intently, I feel like Mr. Creosote, rapidly downloading what I know, sometimes in all directions. For some people, this can be a little annoying. If I've shared anything that was previously unknown by the reader, I hope it helps. OTOH, if you already knew all this (and possibly much more), please excuse my zealousness. It's not my intention to act like the authoritarian windbag in re: All Things Library or dominate the conversation. If I've been preaching to the proverbial choir, I also want to apologize for that. I blame my Library Addiction.  :-[

Cheers!
Virtus Junxit Mors Non Separabit

Muff Diver

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Re: Elevator Music Question
« Reply #7 on: August 14, 2020, 10:13:55 PM »
Have you ever read Joseph Lanza's Elevator Music? If not, it's a good place to start. The book has been revised a few times I believe since its first release in 1995.

https://www.press.umich.edu/8718/elevator_music


Thank you Stack, for the recommendation in re: Elevator Music. I'll add the title to my growing list of books to read.

Virtus Junxit Mors Non Separabit

bardwell64

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Re: Elevator Music Question
« Reply #8 on: August 20, 2020, 08:38:59 PM »
Andrew, would you be prepared to post links to more of your Syd Dale albums from this series?