Author Topic: Recording vinyl process  (Read 293 times)

Uvuzau

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Recording vinyl process
« on: April 27, 2020, 11:27:22 AM »
Hey everyone ,

Im interested to hear what is your process when "ripping" records ?
What kind of software you use or other equipment , do you pay attention to levels when recording , are you using level meters and analyzers (Goniometer, Spectogram, Dbu , RMS etc..)
do you check multi color wave form ?

Are you using any reference material to set the true loudness of recordings to achieve best results ?

I tried to find topic like this but it seems there was no discussion about it before ,
to me this is really important because if you spend time ripping your collection but rip it "wrong" it can be real struggle to go thru everything again , very time consuming process .

Lets see what you guys think about this .

Peace
« Last Edit: April 27, 2020, 11:43:54 AM by Uvuzau »

Mr

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Re: Recording vinyl process
« Reply #1 on: April 27, 2020, 12:20:03 PM »
I try to present the record as authentically as possible.
My chain is as follows:
Turntable -> Amplifier, headphone jack out -> Computer, line in

On the computer, I record through Audacity.
I usually play a few tracks to set the amplifier to the correct level, making sure the peaks aren't running "hot". I find it's useful to do this when switching records, as 80's masters are consistently louder than 60's masters, for instance.
I'm sure tastes might differ here, but I'm not a fan of running the rips through compressors, etc., as this essentially undoes a lot of the handiwork the mastering engineer has done and kills the range.

stackjackson

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Re: Recording vinyl process
« Reply #2 on: April 27, 2020, 01:45:13 PM »

My chain is as follows:
Turntable -> Amplifier, headphone jack out -> Computer, line in


Gotta use an amp!
| Stack |

Uvuzau

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Re: Recording vinyl process
« Reply #3 on: April 27, 2020, 07:01:06 PM »

Turntable -> Amplifier, headphone jack out -> Computer, line in


Yes thats the good chain .
I mostly tend to have some well produced CD master as reference, in style of record im ripping, mostly to check the levels .
I never use compressor or limiter or those "clear vinyl noise" apps , if there is some real issue on record like audible deep scratch i spend some time in Logic Pro to smooth it with bit of filtering only on that specific part not on whole track .

Btw im addicted to checking the multicolor waveform of every music that interest me the most , i find Traktor multicolor waveform pretty much amazing because colors corresponds to audio frequency spectrum exactly as it is , and it is easy to spot are files fake flac wav or mp3 .

frequency sweep from 20Hz to 20 000Hz
« Last Edit: April 27, 2020, 07:18:49 PM by Uvuzau »

Slothish

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Re: Recording vinyl process
« Reply #4 on: April 27, 2020, 08:30:03 PM »
My chain is much like Mr's, although I use the 'tape out' RCA sockets on the back of my amp (it's an old amp, it also has 'MD out!). Gives a good line-level signal.

Into Sony Soundforge and I normalise the audio after removing any loud pops by hand. If it's a record I especially like, I'll go through and remove as many pops as possible. I do this by simply reducing the volume for the duration of the pop. After experimenting years ago, I found that a gap in the audio up to about 12ms is not noticeable, if the ends of it are at 0 volume of course. I've tried those bits of software which do it, but they mangle brass quite badly and similar raspy sounds.

I used to add compression on Cubase but as mentioned, messing with the dynamics is not a good idea. However I'm not tempted to re-rip. Too lazy. Cost/benefit analysis says no!