Author Topic: How do I "define" Library Music?  (Read 2403 times)

bongo_rock

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How do I "define" Library Music?
« on: September 08, 2018, 12:37:01 AM »
A couple of days ago I visited my family of origin, and my father had one of his old buddies over. We started talking about everyday life
and the conversation smoothly went on into music. He said he recently sold all of his old vinyls, and I brought up a Bruton Music vinyl that was laying on the living room desk.
I asked my father's friend if he ever had heard any library music before and he replied curiously "No, I haven't. What is that?". At this point I came into a weird
and rather awkward silence as I was trying to explain and define to him what library music actually is. I had no idea what to say!   :-X

Now, I ended up saying something along the lines of "...it's a form of music that was/is released under a specific form of licenses that was mainly
intended to be used in radio, TV and movies etc. It's pretty rare and seemingly unknown of to most people". My father's friend knodded.

To finally get to the point, because I know I will definitely get into these kinds of occasions again where I tell people about this wonderful world
of music that I am into - How do I define Library Music? Or what defines it specifically? Is there any general explanation that can describe library music and give it justice?  :)

Thank you very much, guys.

tuneboy

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Re: How do I "define" Library Music?
« Reply #1 on: September 08, 2018, 07:28:41 AM »
I have often had that question and I use to answer something like this: "It's music made for films that haven't been made yet, thereby made affordable, without fillmakers having to commission a full soundtrack score and orchestra. It doesn't cover all the bases though.

le_tomval

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Re: How do I "define" Library Music?
« Reply #2 on: September 08, 2018, 08:19:10 AM »
"Records made by good-but-unknown musicians for selling them to TV, Radio, films producers... for their productions"

stackjackson

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Re: How do I "define" Library Music?
« Reply #3 on: September 08, 2018, 01:53:24 PM »
For what it's worth, here's a current industry definition for those who might be interested in getting into the business:

h--ps://www.soundonsound.com/music-business/all-about-library-music-part-1
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Mr

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Re: How do I "define" Library Music?
« Reply #4 on: September 08, 2018, 03:41:40 PM »
Simply put, library music is pre-recorded music found in a production music library.

Generally speaking, I tend to refer to "library music" more as a format than a specific genre, a bit similar to "soundtrack" in this regard.
The 'genre' covers such a broad range of styles, instrumentations and forms that it's a bit hard to boil it down anything specific, I feel.
- I mean, what does Sammy Burdson's "Rush 1" really have in common with pieces like Pavel Blatny's "Dix minutes 30" or Keith Mansfield's "Top Score"?

bongo_rock

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Re: How do I "define" Library Music?
« Reply #5 on: September 09, 2018, 06:02:22 PM »
Thanks guys! I like all of your contributions.

I guess I was somewhat right, then.  :)

Interesting link, stackjackson! I will check that out.

stackjackson

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Re: How do I "define" Library Music?
« Reply #6 on: September 13, 2018, 03:13:51 PM »
  I just started reading The Mood Modern by Oliver Lomax. He gives a nice and succinct definition of "library music" on pages xvi-xvii:


Quote
"But what is a recorded music library? Well, exactly that -- a library of recorded music… another form of soundtrack music, in fact. If, for example, an individual or company has made a documentary or television programme and doesn't have the funds to commission a bespoke score, they can go along to a music library, which has albums organized into categories (dramatic, romantic, industrial, etc.), and license whatever is required quickly and economically. Numerous TV series, adverts, documentaries and films have been scored, either wholly or partly, using library music, and it turns up in all sorts of other places… And because library music is so widely heard yet largely uncredited -- and certainly not sold to the public -- it is "hidden" music, the music you didn't know you knew."


That last line is perfectly stated… library music is "'hidden' music, the music you didn't know you knew."
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le_tomval

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Re: How do I "define" Library Music?
« Reply #7 on: September 14, 2018, 08:55:40 AM »
"You listen to it everyday, but you don't know"

microluv

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Re: How do I "define" Library Music?
« Reply #8 on: January 13, 2019, 12:40:38 AM »
There is even a documentary about it now!
https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=RgOMibjOJcw

Library music is production music, at least the stuff we are all into here, that was background music recorded for film, television and radio.

When you couldn’t afford to have a major composer like John Williams(Star Wars) you would get these libraries of sound that you could pick and choose from to fit your needs.

A cheap solution to get music in your production.

They would seriously sometimes throw, literally throw the record in the damn garbage after they would use one song!!

Some people say that there are a tons of LABELS! We will never find because of that.

Ahhh. I love you library music.

Burtonenq

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Re: How do I "define" Library Music?
« Reply #9 on: June 16, 2020, 12:10:58 AM »
I would explain it, If your a company and you want to recoup some money you spent on creating a piece of music but cant be bothered with the hassle of paperwork you get the library to allow people to use the piece to generate money.  The amount of times I've seen this happening keeps on growing.

magicice

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Re: How do I "define" Library Music?
« Reply #10 on: June 16, 2020, 06:48:10 PM »

That last line is perfectly stated… library music is "'hidden' music, the music you didn't know you knew."

May right. But now many library music is posted to itunes. Such as KPM, West One Music, etc.

magicice

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Re: How do I "define" Library Music?
« Reply #11 on: June 17, 2020, 10:24:23 AM »
By the way, there are many names about it. Such as production music, stock music, library music, commericial music, etc.

But I think library music must be "library" (many albums with album-id, not single track). 

You know some stock music is single track (most of them is Royalty-Free Music). Some people classify production music as royalty-free music and library music, but I think this is wrong. Because some Royalty-Free Music are in "library". Such as sound ideas, fresh music library, nash music library, etc. These music libraries are royalty-free music.
« Last Edit: June 17, 2020, 10:26:21 AM by magicice »

Mr

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Re: How do I "define" Library Music?
« Reply #12 on: June 17, 2020, 11:20:26 AM »
Re: Names, theres a thread about that here, actually.

Upgrade

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Re: How do I "define" Library Music?
« Reply #13 on: September 13, 2020, 04:06:14 AM »
There was this video a while back "Corporate Music - How to Compose with no Soul" by Tantacrul

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AIxY_Y9TGWI

I had forgotten that corporate music was a genre of library music, though it seeme to be more despised nowadays such as the classic ukulele and whistling combination.

He goes on the nature of corporate music, complete with plenty of stock footage, being shallow copies and musically stagnant. He doesn’t quite mention library music or stock music, but kept dancing around it.

It does raise the question to whether if corporate music is just a small part of library music or if the same points can also apply to library music as well.

Mr

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Re: How do I "define" Library Music?
« Reply #14 on: September 13, 2020, 05:21:08 PM »
I saw it, but don't think it applies to most retro library music, just a small section of contemporary cues.