Author Topic: Carlin Archive Series - original sources  (Read 12908 times)

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Carlin Archive Series - original sources
« on: April 26, 2018, 08:53:56 AM »
I believe there was a thread about this on the older board, but it's been lost.

Basically, I've been trying to figure out what were the original music libraries and record labels that the Carlin Archive Series drew from.

Here's what I recall:



Gerhard Trede - CBS EZ Cue, Mozart Edition

Nino Nardini - Sam Fox/Synchro Fox

Harry Bluestone - Musi Que , possibly Capitol Hi-Q ?

Harry Lubin - Harrose ? - haven't been able to find a physical release of his Carlin work

Gabriel Pares - ? Now credited as Lee Jacobs (arranger)?

apmnut

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Re: Carlin Archive Series - original sources
« Reply #1 on: April 27, 2018, 12:55:43 AM »
The stuff from Syd Dale, Joe Sherman, Meyer Kupferman, John Cacavas, Robert Mersey/David Morse and Roger Roger also come from Sam Fox.

The Bluestone/Cadkin cues actually come from their older library, C&B, and selected recordings from that library were re-released by Musi-Que for use in home movies.

Oh, and not archive series, but the Phil Green/Don Lusher/Ray Davies/Frank Barber/Alan Roper cues on CPM's "Pop Kitsch Tijuana", "Dreamy Romantic Strings" and "Latin Holiday Romance" come from Photoplay Q.

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Re: Carlin Archive Series - original sources
« Reply #2 on: April 27, 2018, 03:07:50 AM »
Did the C&B library exist as a record label around the 50s? Haven’t been able to come across a copy.

Musi-Que doesn’t seem to have been issued until the 70s. Though I have another version of the label with a cursive script logo that I’ve been meaning to upload.

Mr

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Re: Carlin Archive Series - original sources
« Reply #3 on: April 27, 2018, 04:41:50 AM »
Harry Bluestone's "Blue River Music" was established c. 1952. The material is probably from the 50's/early 60's, yeah.

Gerhard Trede - CBS EZ Cue
That doesn't sound right. I doubt Carlin has the rights to anything from CBS' library.
I think Trede had his own library, from whom CBS probably licensed some cues. I think the same was the case for Mozart Edition. - or through Selected Sound?

Gabriel Pares - ? Now credited as Lee Jacobs (arranger)?
Gabriel Pares = Philippe Parès, who did some work for Sam Fox/Synchro and Southern. "Lee Jacobs" is an alias of an unrelated composer, Nicholas Farries.
« Last Edit: April 27, 2018, 04:49:41 AM by Mr »

apmnut

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Re: Carlin Archive Series - original sources
« Reply #4 on: April 27, 2018, 09:37:55 PM »
Did the C&B library exist as a record label around the 50s? Haven’t been able to come across a copy.

Musi-Que doesn’t seem to have been issued until the 70s. Though I have another version of the label with a cursive script logo that I’ve been meaning to upload.

I've got a gut feeling a LOT of US library material from that period was released on reel-to-reel tape, so that's probably why albums from this label haven't surfaced, although either Carlin or Warner-Tamerlane (who's credited as published for these cues on BMI) probably have them in their archives.

Mr

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Re: Carlin Archive Series - original sources
« Reply #5 on: April 28, 2018, 09:03:03 AM »
Yeah - as was commented in the past, some were also based in Hollywood, and probably didn't need to release any promotional material on vinyl.

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Re: Carlin Archive Series - original sources
« Reply #6 on: April 30, 2018, 09:03:43 PM »
Magnetic tape would have been a relatively new technology in the 50s. Even with Bing Crosby’s help in commercializing the format, I question whether entire library labels would have converted wholesale to reel to reel so soon.

The vinyl LP was unveiled in 1948, but you still have library music being issued on 78s well into the 60s.


Also Gerhard Trede’s 70s and on work appears to have been issued on Selected Sound.

Was his 60s and earlier work only published through Mozart Edition and CBS EZ Cue or are there others? Did Gehard Trede have a publishing company prior to the CD era?

Mr

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Re: Carlin Archive Series - original sources
« Reply #7 on: April 30, 2018, 11:41:02 PM »
Magnetic tape would have been a relatively new technology in the 50s. Even with Bing Crosby’s help in commercializing the format, I question whether entire library labels would have converted wholesale to reel to reel so soon.
That's a very good point, actually.

The vinyl LP was unveiled in 1948, but you still have library music being issued on 78s well into the 60s.
I think that may have been a bit region-specific. Outside the UK, the only label with 78s I can recall off-hand is NY's Major Records. It was never a format of choice in Italy.
« Last Edit: April 30, 2018, 11:43:28 PM by Mr »

apmnut

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Re: Carlin Archive Series - original sources
« Reply #8 on: March 27, 2019, 05:41:34 PM »
Magnetic tape would have been a relatively new technology in the 50s. Even with Bing Crosby’s help in commercializing the format, I question whether entire library labels would have converted wholesale to reel to reel so soon.
That's a very good point, actually.

The vinyl LP was unveiled in 1948, but you still have library music being issued on 78s well into the 60s.
I think that may have been a bit region-specific. Outside the UK, the only label with 78s I can recall off-hand is NY's Major Records. It was never a format of choice in Italy.

Very late reply, I know, but two other US labels who released work on 78s were Emil Ascher's Video Moods and the Audio-Master Corporation's BG Library labels.

musictheorist

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Re: Carlin Archive Series - original sources
« Reply #9 on: May 21, 2020, 05:31:56 PM »





https://www.discogs.com/The-White-Caps-Hi-Roll-Fender-Vendor/release/4200007

Here is an interesting find. As Carlin acquired the Blue River label.

They rename some of their tracks and credited Bluestone for it.

These tracks have these original names. "Hi-Roll" and "Fender Vendor" from 1963.

Bluestone was credited for these tracks when re-issued. The tracks are now called "Beach Party" and "Saxaboogie".

Walk the Skies 202

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Re: Carlin Archive Series - original sources
« Reply #10 on: May 31, 2020, 09:27:57 AM »
As Carlin acquired the Blue River label.

They rename some of their tracks and credited Bluestone for it.

These tracks have these original names. "Hi-Roll" and "Fender Vendor" from 1963.

Bluestone was credited for these tracks when re-issued. The tracks are now called "Beach Party" and "Saxaboogie".
Interesting discovery! Makes me curious as to just what attribution info in this series is correct and what's been attributed to somebody else.

apmnut

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Re: Carlin Archive Series - original sources
« Reply #11 on: May 31, 2020, 02:14:54 PM »
Well, of course all those tracks attributed to "Lee Jacobs" (Nick Farries) weren't actually written by him.

As for the Bluestone + Cadkin stuff, the jazzier tracks like "Fruity Flute" and "Basement Jazz" 1 and 2 definitely aren't by Bluestone. Same with the  SFX on the "Shorts Solo Instruments and FX" album. I wish I knew where those came from, but some of those effects were used in Gumby and the Larry Harmon-produced Popeye and Bozo the Clown shorts.

Walk the Skies 202

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Re: Carlin Archive Series - original sources
« Reply #12 on: May 31, 2020, 11:33:07 PM »
Well, of course all those tracks attributed to "Lee Jacobs" (Nick Farries) weren't actually written by him.

As for the Bluestone + Cadkin stuff, the jazzier tracks like "Fruity Flute" and "Basement Jazz" 1 and 2 definitely aren't by Bluestone. Same with the  SFX on the "Shorts Solo Instruments and FX" album. I wish I knew where those came from, but some of those effects were used in Gumby and the Larry Harmon-produced Popeye and Bozo the Clown shorts.
One thing I'm certain of is that all the sax/big band tracks attributed to "David Morse" are for a fact by Robert Mersey. This is re-affirmed by Sam Fox, Capitol Hi-Q, a publicly released record known as "Jazz from Great TV Shows," and was even on the APM site before the CPM split, so I've no idea where Warner/Chappell and elsewhere pulled that one from.

Wouldn't be surprised if, unless they were made to sound vintage, the bluesy vocal songs on CAR-347 (featuring a few archive series tracks) are not by Bob Barratt and Colin Frechter at all.

apmnut

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Re: Carlin Archive Series - original sources
« Reply #13 on: June 01, 2020, 01:28:48 AM »
Well, of course all those tracks attributed to "Lee Jacobs" (Nick Farries) weren't actually written by him.

As for the Bluestone + Cadkin stuff, the jazzier tracks like "Fruity Flute" and "Basement Jazz" 1 and 2 definitely aren't by Bluestone. Same with the  SFX on the "Shorts Solo Instruments and FX" album. I wish I knew where those came from, but some of those effects were used in Gumby and the Larry Harmon-produced Popeye and Bozo the Clown shorts.
One thing I'm certain of is that all the sax/big band tracks attributed to "David Morse" are for a fact by Robert Mersey. This is re-affirmed by Sam Fox, Capitol Hi-Q, a publicly released record known as "Jazz from Great TV Shows," and was even on the APM site before the CPM split, so I've no idea where Warner/Chappell and elsewhere pulled that one from.
Similar situation with the John Cacavas stuff, which is now attributed to "Mark Winter" (Bonnie Becker Cacavas).